Canada Singapore Free Trade Agreement

Canada is conducting exploratory discussions on bilateral or multilateral free trade agreements with the following countries and trade blocs, although formal negotiations have not yet begun:[7] Other URL: www.canadainternational.gc.ca/singapore-singapour/ An Agreement on the Promotion and Protection of Foreign Investment (FIPA) is an agreement to promote foreign investment. A first round of negotiations took place in Singapore during the week of 21 January 2002. The second round took place in Ottawa from February 25 to March 1, 2002 and the third round in Singapore from April 29 to May 3 of the same year. Three more rounds of negotiations took place in 2003, with the sixth round taking place in Ottawa from September 29 to October 3. At the 2006 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) ministerial meetings, Canada and Singapore agreed to resume negotiations for a free trade agreement. The seventh round of negotiations took place in Singapore on 26 February 2007. Use the drop-down menu to search for an agreement by grouping of countries, type of contract or status. Or use the filter option to search for keywords. The RCEP will require the ratification of 6 of the 10 ASEAN member states and 3 of the five ASEAN-FTA partners for the agreement to enter into force. Therefore, the timing of implementation depends on the internal processes for ratification of the agreement by RCEP partners. The RCEP establishes a modern, comprehensive, quality and mutually beneficial economic partnership that builds on ASEAN`s existing bilateral agreements with its five partners in the Free Trade Agreement (FTA). The RCEP, which accounts for about 30% of the world`s gross domestic product (GDP) and accounts for nearly one-third of the world`s population, is the world`s largest free trade agreement to date. As an important regional agreement, the Singapore RCEP will complement the existing network of free trade agreements, expand our economic space and stimulate trade and investment flows.

Discover new ways to expand your international presence. Canada`s broad (and growing) commercial network provides Canadian businesses with preferential access to various markets around the world. This page examines Canada`s Free Trade Agreement (FTA), Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreements (FIPA), multilateral agreements and World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements. Note: The texts of the treaty on this page are exclusively for information; the official texts of the treaties are published in the “Treaty of Canada” series. On June 5, 2000, Canada and Singapore announced that they would explore the possibility of negotiating a bilateral free trade agreement. Negotiations for a free trade agreement were announced on 21 October 2001 in Shanghai, China. Free trade agreements are treaties that facilitate trade and investment between two or more economies. Singapore has an open economy, fuelled by trade in goods and services. Over the years, it has established an extensive network of 25 agreements implemented. The North American Free Trade Agreement between Canada, the United States and Mexico came into force on January 1, 1994 and created the world`s largest post-GDP free trade region.

Until 2014, NAFTA`s GDP was estimated at more than $20 trillion, with a market of 474 million people. [5] [6] Based on this success, Canada continues to negotiate free trade agreements with more than 40 countries and has free trade agreements, most recently with South Korea, Canada`s first free trade agreement with an Asia-Pacific partner. Since 2018, Canada has also concluded two other important multilateral trade agreements: the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the European Union and the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) agreement with 10 other Pacific countries. [7] On September 21, 2017, CETA was provisionally implemented, immediately removing 98% of the EU`s customs positions on Canadian products. [8] Canada is currently the only G7 country to have free trade agreements with all other G7 countries.

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